seat of the week

You often hear about the chair in this journal.
I say ‘chair’ but I speak of every object in the room.
When I say chair, I speak of the table,
I speak of the bed
I speak of books
I speak of you.

When you see or hear about the chair in this journal,
allow it to take on the shape of any object you’re ready to start dialogue with.


Above: Clean design, optimum comfort. Spotted in the Paramount at South Market.

See others that have been featured here.

 

seat of the week

mac collins

You often hear about the chair in this journal.
I say ‘chair’ but I speak of every object in the room.
When i say chair, I speak of the table,
I speak of the bed
I speak of books
I speak of you.

When you see or hear about the chair in this journal,
allow it to take on the shape of any object you’re ready to start dialogue with.


Above: Iklwa by Mac Collins. “…when used, the throne conjures up notions of authority, empowerment and dominance against oppression.
“Drawing inspiration from his African Cultural heritage, Mac has created a furniture piece which is in tune with the ideas of Afrocentrism and Afrofuturism. Through a composition of powerful, spear-like forms, an encompassing backrest and a vivid, ultramarine hue, the designer has created a visually intense object designed to dominate and overwhelm its surroundings.” As described on maccollins.com

See others that have been featured here.

a tree in disguise

knot

I bought a table from an actor lady who had lived in New Orleans for no more than three months before deciding the city just wasn’t for her. I started to tell her it takes longer than a few months to know if something’s right for you, especially a new home, especially in New Orleans, but I stopped myself. Maybe a few months was all she needed. Plus her mind was already made. She was anxious to be rid of the small bit of furniture she acquired. Most of it, including this table, was bought secondhand. That was in June of this year [2018]. So in just seven months, the wandering table has had at least three homes.

before

I’m currently stripping the paint and plan to later refinish. Stripping paint by hand is tedious, painful even. And yet, satisfying. It’s like unwrapping a gift. Or the curious feeling of staring at yourself in the mirror after taking makeup off. Every strip is a new surprise. One knot was so pretty my heart jumped. Beneath layers of red, blue, purple and brown is not a table, but the skin of a tree in disguise. I wonder where the tree lived, how tall it was, how many years it stood before its death.

knot reveal

strippin

This is my first attempt at a refinish and I can admit that I’ve beat the little table up a good bit. I’ve dented the wood and sanded grooves into it by accident. With the help of some hand planes, I hope to restore some of the wood’s integrity by the time I’m done.

when building day becomes f–k this sh-t

waste redefined

My morning went so smooth.
I plowed through my errands and ended up back home by 1pm with all the materials for my workbench.

building day

I ate some lunch and shortly after, my body said ‘let’s take a breather. let’s think for a second.’ I reluctantly obliged. I laid down for a quick twenty minutes before I had enough. I was ready to get to it. I had set this time aside for building and so no matter what, I had to build.

That was probably my first, most obvious mistake: ignoring my body.
That decision was followed by a series of setbacks.

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Yaku Sugi

from George Nakashima’s ‘The Soul Of a Tree’

yaku sugi

The Yaku cedars have spent their lifetime witnessing the long and awesome march of generation after generation of the human race, the march of nation after nation. They have seen cultures, civilizations, one after another rise and fall. By human inspiration, or by sheer egotism, great cities were constructed, finally to return to dust. Some are no longer remembered even as names. Pataliputra flowered, the Chou became great; and Sanskrit, the greatest of all human tongues, recorded the Vedas, the Upanishads and the Bhagavad Gita. Continue reading

a painful lesson in patience

At the end of 2017, I wrote out a month by month plan for the start of a furniture and home decor line. I chose March as the month I would make my first investment. Initially, it would have been a metal shed to store my tools and work pieces. I later decided a wooden shed would be a better fit.

It would be my first official project. the foundation of the business. The home base for the fundamental tools. It would empower me daily to know that from the ground up I built the foundation of my brand.

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